Author: Andrew Piper

Are novels getting easier to read?

Are novels getting easier to read?

I’ve been experimenting with using readability metrics lately. They offer a very straightforward way of measuring textual difficulty, usually consisting of some ratio of sentence and word length. They date back to the work of Rudolf Flesch, who developed the “Flesch Reading Ease” metric. Today, […]

An Open Letter to the MLA

An Open Letter to the MLA

Dear Prof. Taylor, I am writing to you as a member of the MLA who has concerns about the practices and policies relating to the society’s data and its impact on research. This is an issue that effects many scholarly organizations. For this reason I […]

The Legibility Project: Reversing the dark economy of academic labor

The Legibility Project: Reversing the dark economy of academic labor

Here is an example of the kind of registry I am thinking of, using my own activity as a starting point. On-going duties include:¬†Undergraduate Advisor European Studies Minor, Editor Cultural Analytics, Board Member¬†Centre for Social and Cultural Data Science Over the years I have become […]

1000 Words

1000 Words

Lab member Fedor Karmanov has created a beautiful new project that combines machine vision, machine learning, and poetry. It is called “1,000 Words,” and takes the self-portraits of Van Gogh and generates poems based on the colours and items in the portrait. The poems consist […]

The Danger of the Single Story – Why Quantity Matters

The Danger of the Single Story – Why Quantity Matters

I listened to a beautiful podcast the other day by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on “the danger of the single story.” Her point was that when we only tell one kind of story about a person or a place we cheapen our understanding. She began with […]

AI across the Generations

AI across the Generations

I gave a talk today with Paul Yachnin to the McGill Community for Lifelong Learning on “Conscientious AI.” The idea for the event was to give the audience some understanding of how machine learning works and what you might do with it. We then asked […]

On Prestige Bias in the Chronicle of Higher Ed

On Prestige Bias in the Chronicle of Higher Ed

The Chronicle of Higher Education ran a version of our essay on the concentration of institutional prestige as its cover story this week. In it we expand our reflections about how to change the current system. The essay is based on our original piece that […]

The Prestige Trap

The Prestige Trap

I am pleased to announce the publication of a new piece out with Chad Wellmon in Critical Inquiry entitled, “Publication, Power, and Patronage: On Inequality and Academic Publishing.” In it we discuss the concentration of a few elite institutions within a sample of four humanities […]


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