Author: Andrew Piper

Calling on Citizen Readers!

Calling on Citizen Readers!

I am delighted to announce a new lab initiative that is building a citizen science platform to annotate stories. We’re calling it Citizen Readers and the aim of the platform is to invite readers from around the world to help us better understand storytelling. While 

Biodiversity is not declining in fiction: An effort at replication

Biodiversity is not declining in fiction: An effort at replication

In a new paper out, we attempt to replicate the findings of the recent work, “The rise and fall of biodiversity in literature,” by Langer et al. (2021). Using a large corpus from Project Gutenberg (N = ~15,000) and a dictionary-matching method of over 240K 

The Covid That Wasn’t: Counterfactual Journalism Using GPT

The Covid That Wasn’t: Counterfactual Journalism Using GPT

Very excited to announce a new student-led paper out in the ACL Proceedings as part of the SIGHUM workshop. The project was designed and carried out by Sil Hamilton, MA student in Digital Humanities at McGill, and provides a great insight into how we can 

Introducing the CONLIT dataset of contemporary literature

Introducing the CONLIT dataset of contemporary literature

Excited to announce the release of a new data set curated by my lab. Special thanks go to Joey Love and Eve Kraicer for their work in helping bring this to fruition. This dataset includes derived data on a collection of ca. 2,700 books in 

AI and Literature – LLCU 301

AI and Literature – LLCU 301

If you’re interested in how NLP, AI, machine learning and computational language models are changing how we understand and study storytelling, then come check out my course LLCU 301. Blurb and time below. AI and Literature MW 11:35-12:55 How does the automated processing of language 

Computationally Modelling The Shape of Stories: A Research Program

Computationally Modelling The Shape of Stories: A Research Program

I’ll be giving a keynote address to the 4th Workshop on Narrative Understanding at this year‘s NAACL conference. I’m pasting in the abstract below. The motivation behind the talk is that there has been a lot of interesting work over the years exploring how to 

Why? Capturing causal reasoning in narrative

Why? Capturing causal reasoning in narrative

One of the principal reasons we tell stories is to explain why something happened. A story consists of the recounting of a series of events. The causes of those events are often attached to different agents, either more or less explicitly. Narrative is a powerful 

Buying the news

Buying the news

We have a new piece out in the journal, New Media and Society, by lead author and lab student, Benjamin LeBrun, on the effects of hedge fund ownership on local news coverage. We were inspired to start this project by a piece that appeared back