Tag: Disciplinary Knowledge

Do wikipedia editors specialize?

Do wikipedia editors specialize?

One of the students in our lab, Nathan Drezner, has a new collaboration out entitled, “Everyday Specialization: The coherence of editorial communities on Wikipedia.” In this paper, Drezner studies edit histories of over 30,000 Wiki pages across four different cultural domains (science, sports, culture, and 

Can We Be Wrong?

Can We Be Wrong?

I have a new book out. It’s called “Can We Be Wrong? The Problem of Textual Evidence in a Time of Data.” The goal of the book is to change the terms of debate surrounding the place of computational literary analysis within the field literary 

Measuring Unreading

Measuring Unreading

In a new piece out in the Goethe Yearbook, I and my co-author, student James Manalad, use text re-use algorithms to better understand citational practices within scholarly publications. In particular we look at how Goethe’s collected works are directly quoted in 68 volumes of the 

The scientization of literary studies

The scientization of literary studies

In a new work out, I have teamed-up with my collaborator Stephania DeGaetano-Ortlieb to try to model what we call “the scientization of literary study.” The study of literature has historically been seen as a scholarly practice that is distinct from the natural sciences. Literary 

Why are non-data driven representations of data-driven research in the humanities so bad?

Why are non-data driven representations of data-driven research in the humanities so bad?

One of the more frustrating aspects of working in data-driven research today is the representation of such research by people who do not use data. Why? Because it is not subject to the same rules of evidence. If you don’t like data, it turns out