Recent Posts

Celebrating 5 Years of Cultural Analytics

Celebrating 5 Years of Cultural Analytics

I am very proud to announce that the journal that I edit and co-founded has turned five! In the past five years, the Journal of Cultural Analytics has published 107 articles, 5 special issues, moved through two open-access publishing platforms, accrued over 1,000 subscribers, is 

Narrative Theory for Computational Narrative Understanding

Narrative Theory for Computational Narrative Understanding

I have a new piece out with co-authors David Bamman and Richard Jean So in the forthcoming proceedings of the Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP) conference. Our goal in the paper is to provide NLP researchers with a clear theoretical framework to computationally 

Fiction’s Functions, or Year-End Round-Up

Fiction’s Functions, or Year-End Round-Up

It’s been a fun year at .txtlab. We’ve done projects on queer fan fiction, the effects of corporate ownership on local news, narrativity across long time scales, minor literature and literary nationalism, measuring bias in machine learning, narratives to support sustainable business practices in small 

Modeling Minor Literature

Modeling Minor Literature

In a recent publication with Matt Erlin, we tested Pascale Casanova’s claim in The World Republic of Letters that literatures associated with minor languages will be more overtly nationalistic in order to gain attention on the world literary stage. We show that despite Casanova’s thesis 

Measuring Bias in Literary Classification

Measuring Bias in Literary Classification

I have a new paper out with former student Sunyam Bagga for the latest proceedings of the Joint SIGHUM Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, Humanities and Literature (LatechCLFL). For those who are working on computational text analysis of historical documents I 

Counting and Reading

Counting and Reading

I recently wrote a reflection piece on the relationship between quantity and reading for a new volume on “Further Reading” by Leah Price and Matthew Rubery. The collection contains a number of amazing contributions and I encourage you to have a look. In my piece 

The Page Image

The Page Image

Really excited to share this new work that appeared in the lates issue of Book History. It is based on our multi-year collaboration with Chad Wellmon (UVA) and Mohamed Cheriet (ETS). It represents our second major output from the “Visibility of Knowledge” project, which aims 

Do wikipedia editors specialize?

Do wikipedia editors specialize?

One of the students in our lab, Nathan Drezner, has a new collaboration out entitled, “Everyday Specialization: The coherence of editorial communities on Wikipedia.” In this paper, Drezner studies edit histories of over 30,000 Wiki pages across four different cultural domains (science, sports, culture, and