The Page Image

The Page Image

Really excited to share this new work that appeared in the lates issue of Book History. It is based on our multi-year collaboration with Chad Wellmon (UVA) and Mohamed Cheriet (ETS). It represents our second major output from the “Visibility of Knowledge” project, which aims 

Do wikipedia editors specialize?

Do wikipedia editors specialize?

One of the students in our lab, Nathan Drezner, has a new collaboration out entitled, “Everyday Specialization: The coherence of editorial communities on Wikipedia.” In this paper, Drezner studies edit histories of over 30,000 Wiki pages across four different cultural domains (science, sports, culture, and 

Can We Be Wrong?

Can We Be Wrong?

I have a new book out. It’s called “Can We Be Wrong? The Problem of Textual Evidence in a Time of Data.” The goal of the book is to change the terms of debate surrounding the place of computational literary analysis within the field literary 

Measuring Unreading

Measuring Unreading

In a new piece out in the Goethe Yearbook, I and my co-author, student James Manalad, use text re-use algorithms to better understand citational practices within scholarly publications. In particular we look at how Goethe’s collected works are directly quoted in 68 volumes of the 

How do disciplines change?

How do disciplines change?

Over the past few years I’ve become interested in better understanding how my own discipline works. As someone whose work has changed considerably over the past decade, it’s probably a predictable response. In one sense, it is about asking, How do I fit in? On 

The scientization of literary studies

The scientization of literary studies

In a new work out, I have teamed-up with my collaborator Stephania DeGaetano-Ortlieb to try to model what we call “the scientization of literary study.” The study of literature has historically been seen as a scholarly practice that is distinct from the natural sciences. Literary 

Are academics more unequal than athletics? A new collaboration by Brian Powell

Are academics more unequal than athletics? A new collaboration by Brian Powell

Our latest lab collaboration was created by McGill undergraduate Brian Powell. As a college basketball fan, he was interested in whether the high levels of institutional inequality within academic publishing and hiring that we have been seeing would also hold true within college athletics. Did 

Introducing The Fish and the Painting: a new open access handbook-in-progress on data-driven humanities research

Introducing The Fish and the Painting: a new open access handbook-in-progress on data-driven humanities research

It’s like hitting a painting with a fish. This was the quip that a well-known British novelist made when asked about using computation to study literature. You could, but why would you? I think it’s becoming increasingly clear to people all of the ways data