Tag: World Literature

Modeling Minor Literature

Modeling Minor Literature

In a recent publication with Matt Erlin, we tested Pascale Casanova’s claim in The World Republic of Letters that literatures associated with minor languages will be more overtly nationalistic in order to gain attention on the world literary stage. We show that despite Casanova’s thesis 

Does size matter? Measuring worlding

Does size matter? Measuring worlding

A lot of the hoopla around big data has revolved around a hierarchy of scale. Many businesses and organizations don’t quite understand how much data is required for their needs. More often than not, they need to find the best residential proxy that will be 

Novel Worlds: Theory + Computation

Novel Worlds: Theory + Computation

I am very excited for our *fifth* (!) annual NovelTM conference coming up this week. The aim of this year’s conference is to begin the long overdue conversation between data-driven research and literary scholarship more generally. The particular theme of the conference will centre around the 

World Authorship: Three Computational Frameworks

World Authorship: Three Computational Frameworks

The following is a condensed version of a talk I delivered recently at Lancaster University in the UK as part of the research project on “Authors and the World.” Both “world” and “authorship” are complex terms that have, on the one hand, very straightforward meanings 

Digging into Data Award

Digging into Data Award

We learned that we have been awarded a Digging into Data Grant for our project, “Global Currents: Cultures of Literary Networks, 1050-1900.” Our project will undertake the cross-cultural study of literary networks in a global context, ranging from post-classical Islamic philosophy to the European Enlightenment. 

Digging into Data: Global Currents

Digging into Data: Global Currents

What can you learn from the visual features of a page? This is the question that lies at the centre of our digging into data project, the awards for which were announced yesterday. A vast amount of our textual heritage has so far been resistant