Tag: academic publishing

Does the decline of gender within literary studies matter?

Does the decline of gender within literary studies matter?

A little while back I posted on the unmoving ratio between male/female pronouns in a data set of ~60,000 articles in literary studies. The ratio has been stable at about 2:1 since the mid-1990s. While pronouns do not tell us everything we need to know […]

On Colons, or Standardization in Literary Studies

On Colons, or Standardization in Literary Studies

Sometimes things don’t need to be complicated. Have you ever wondered about the convention of using colons in titles of academic articles? As in, “Here’s my big idea: now let me narrow it down for you”? Well, I’ve never actually seen something that exhibits this […]

The great ________ novel: How scholars classify the novel

The great ________ novel: How scholars classify the novel

Ever since Fotis Jannidis posted a graph on novel classification a few years ago I have been inspired to do something similar in English. What are the ways in which scholars over the past half-century have classified “the novel”? Using a collection of over 60,000 […]

Gender Trouble: Literary Studies’ He/She Problem

Gender Trouble: Literary Studies’ He/She Problem

Pronouns have become a hot topic of late and I thought it would be interesting to explore their use in the new JSTOR data set that I have been working on that represents 60 years of literary studies articles. Previous work has shown how men […]

Topic Stability, Part 2

Topic Stability, Part 2

In my previous post I tried to illustrate how different runs of the same topic modelling process can produce topics that appear to be slightly semantically different from one another. If you keep k and all other parameters constant, but change your initial seed, you’ll […]

Topic Modelling Literary Studies: Topic Stability, Part 1

Topic Modelling Literary Studies: Topic Stability, Part 1

I’ve started working with a new data set of ca. 60,000 articles from the field of literary studies published between 1950 and 2010 courtesy of JSTOR. I’ll have more to say about the data set in the coming weeks, but for now I want to […]

The Replication Crisis I: Restoring confidence in research through replication clusters

The Replication Crisis I: Restoring confidence in research through replication clusters

Much has been written about the so-called “replication crisis” going on across the sciences today. There are many ways that these issues impact literary and cultural studies, but not always in the most straightforward way. “Replication” has a complicated fit with more interpretive disciplines and […]


%d bloggers like this: